The best life is a God First life

Category: Learning

Love of Sports, Love of God

A lot of people get very excited about sports. It’s a topic of numerous conversations. Seldom am I with a group of men where sports is not immediately part of the conversation or dominates it.

Many parents rightfully recognize the benefits of raising their children to grasp the positive principles of sports and start them playing very early in life. Lifelong friendships build as parents help each other with rides and mutually encourage their children and each other.

As a result, Money, Time, and Schedules are eagerly manipulated so that parents can be supportive of events, practice meets, or games by their presence, and the value of teamwork is fortified. Families unite in sports talk, laughs, jokes, etc., discuss sports greats, sportsmanship, teamwork, missed opportunities, and often spend countless hours watching professional sports together.

These bonding moments are excellent training and contribute to building solid friendships and good character in our young adults to help them navigate life.

Isn’t this precisely how we should prioritize, teach, and share Christ in our lives?

Shouldn’t our conversations and social media posts include glorifying and sharing the blessings of Christ and showing concern for others?

If we showed our love for God the way we show our love for sports, how would our lives change?

What would it look like if our interest in God took priority over our interest in sports?

  • Would we start our children attending bible classes early in life?
  • Would we prioritize our schedules to ensure committed involvement in Church activities?
  • Would we prioritize teaching our children the love of Christ?
  • Would we encourage their understanding and development of leadership skills?

Imagine how excellent this world would be if the same effort we put into sports were put into following and sharing the message of Christ?

We would excel at learning everything we could about our creator. Jesus would be prominent in daily conversations and taking His name in vain, absent.

Instead, we would seek to be as Christ-like as possible, making every effort to do God’s Will according to what God tells us in scripture and our time would be arranged so that we could be involved in as many good works as possible.

If the world were to embrace God the way many embrace sports, we would put our service to God above all else, and our children would take notice. Just as they will notice, if we make exceptions, making exceptions sends the message that we believe it’s ok to deprioritize God from Time to Time, and that’s never ok!

Sports may bring a lifetime of happy moments but should never take priority over God, where blessings go far beyond this lifetime and lead us to our eternal home, a glorious place without tears, pain, or woes.

God First!

  • Acts 20:32
  • Jude 1:25
  • 2 Timothy 3:15-17
  • 1 Corinthians 14:26
  • Philippians 3:21
  • 1 Thessalonians 5:11
  • Romans 1:12
  • Ephesians 4:15-16
  • John 3:16-17
  • John 17:3
  • Matthew 6:23-24
  • 1 Timothy 1:17
  • 1 Corinthians 2:9
  • 1 Corinthians 8:6
  • Luke 15:7
  • Matthew 7:21-23
  • Matthew 25:46
  • Philippians 3:20-21
  • Revelation 21:9-12
  • Revelation 12:4

To God be the Glory!

Ever had someone take credit for your accomplishments? How did you or would you feel feel about it? Maybe it was a trivial matter, so you just let it go. I’ve done this too; it still rubbed me the wrong way, even if just a little. Now, let’s magnify the situation.

Suppose you developed a single cure for all cancers and shared it. Yet, instead of being appreciated, praised, and given credit for all your work, credit is taken or given elsewhere. Would you be upset?

I would probably do all I could to Let the world know; THIS IS MY DOING, AND I CAN PROVE IT. Stop giving credit elsewhere; I created this cure! I would assemble all my proof, witnesses’ testimonies, etc., and present them to the world as best I could. But, what if, rather than admit their deception, the unscrupulous attack the Truth with false information and lies to take or give credit elsewhere. How would you like this? How would you respond?

Unfortunately, This is how God is treated repeatedly.

Despite the fact that God’s proof is all around us. That Science, Math, and History truly support what we find in Scripture, and that God is the most logical explanation as the Creator of everything we know many actively work to give credit elsewhere. Sadly, the gullible then fall prey to praising the creations of God rather than God Himself. History shows people inherently desire to worship something; they want to put faith in something they deem greater than themselves. Worship and praise have been given to such things as the moon, the sun, stars, mountains, water, fire, animals. Numerous statues have been made and erected to worship, and numerous theories have been invented and taught.

Today, many give the credit that belongs to God to those touting disbelief under the disguise of science. Technical-sounding words are created and used to create hypothetical theories and then presented as sound science.

Think about it, Theories are taught to our most gullible, our children, and told it is science. Our children are taught to believe our creation was a fluke accident where nothing exploded into something rather than God Created All. That a spec of absolutely nothing too small for our eyes to see exploded into something that created planets in a perfect universal placement to provide life on Earth. Then, over billions of years developed into the perfectly designed world of nature and life, we live in today. That Animal and Human life were some natural phenomena and that our human ancestry is monkeys. If not from God, Where did our intelligence come from?

Were you taught this? Did you or do you currently lend “ANY” credence to these theories today? God gave us free will that we may choose to look at the evidence. God would not have given us so much proof if expected blind faith only.

EVERYTHING CREATED IS GOD’S DOING, AND HE PROVES ITTO GOD BE THE GLORY!

  • Genesis 1:1
  • Romans 1:20-25
  • Revelation 4:11
  • John 1:3
  • Colossians 1:16
  • 1 Corinthians 8:6
  • Nehemiah 9:6
  • Psalm 33:6
  • Genesis 1:1-37
  • Genesis 1:27
  • Psalm 19:1
  • Hebrews 11:1-3
  • John 1:1-3
  • Exodus 34:14
  • Deuteronomy 5:9
  • Exodus 20:1-26
  • Jeremiah 10:12
  • Isaiah 45:18
  • Romans 10:17
  • Proverbs 3:13
  • James 1:5
  • 1 Peter 3:15-16
  • Isaiah 1:18
  • John 20:31
  • 2 Timothy 2:15

God First!

Learning from self-evaluation

Self-evaluation is not about longing for our past but instead learning from it!

Some say: Always look forward, never look back! So, if by looking back, you find yourself longing for those past days and focusing so much on what you once did that it distracts you from being content and enjoying what you can still do at the moment, this is a valid point. In this respect, I struggle in tennis, falling prey to looking back and longing for the game I once played with its power and speed. But, in doing so, I steal from the moment and all it could be If I would just let it.

However, self-reflection and evaluation are different from looking back and getting stuck in the past. When we evaluate ourselves, we create opportunities to take pauses and learn from our experiences.

Self-reflection is essential, it does indeed stir up feelings of embarrassment, regret, and sadness, but it also stirs up levels of self-validation, self-approval, smiles, and laughter which can add to our contentment.

For example, looking back on one such moment was embarrassing and funny.

It was in the late 80s; There was once a popular sitcom cartoon on TV called “The Simpsons,” One of the characters was “Bartman,” which was the superhero alter ego of “Bart Simpson.” Although I was not a fan of the show, Virginia gave me a pair of Bartman shorts for my 30th Birthday.

A couple of weeks later, probably in November of 1989, we met our friends Jan and Wayne to play mixed doubles tennis. It was a chilly day, so we all started in warmups. As we played, the clothing trickled off till I was down to a T-shirt and my new shorts. A few points after removing my warmup pants, Jan paused the match to ask: Are you going to play in underwear? I quickly stated: No, these are Bartman shorts; Virginia got me for my Birthday.

Jan responds: with a flap in the middle?

I was instantly embarrassed as I realized they were “Bartman boxers,” not shorts. I had never worn boxers and assumed they were regular shorts. Needless to say, I immediately put my warmup pants back on, was relentlessly teased, and we laughed about it.

However, this moment of embarrassment etched a permanent place in my mind, and I learned at least three things from experience.

  • Assumptions are dangerous (Be more careful)
  • Details are important (Pay closer attention)
  • Relentless teasing ( It’s going to happen)

Without self-reflection and self-evaluation, we hinder self-accountability, which helps us make better choices on what to and not do in the future.

Scripturally, We find attributes of self-reflection and evaluation attributed to many of King Soloman’s writings. A man gifted with wisdom from God. And, in the Psalms of David, more on this later.

God First!

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